Expert answer:Fiction Essay Based on a short story (5 pages)

  

Solved by verified expert:I need an essay for Interpretation of Fiction that should be 5 pages. It should contain 4 assertions and 5 paragraphs.Important !!! > Please read the following files that will be attached before proceeding to writing.(Elements of Fiction, Prompt, Story and the Example Essay that was written on the same topic. I will attach the prompt, the 2 and half page story and also an essay on the same topic that could serve as an idea for you.
example_essay.docx

example_essay.docx

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Expert answer:Fiction Essay Based on a short story (5 pages)
Just from $10/Page
Order Essay

water_names___lan_samantha_chang.pdf

elements_of_fiction.docx

example_essay.docx

prompt.docx

water_names___lan_samantha_chang.pdf

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Name
Professor
Fiction
Date
Emigration and Fading Heritage in “Water Names”
Lan Samantha Chang’s short story “Water Names” constructs an artful comparison
between the ancient Chinese culture and modern American culture. In a way, the story imitates
the immigration experience, setting the old Chinese tale into a modern American framework; the
grandmother, who remembers Chinese culture, is set against the granddaughters, who behave
much more like the American girls they are intended to portray. The grandmother and her
granddaughters are in the midst of the American lifestyle, while the oral tradition of storytelling
and the characters in the story that’s told are meant to represent Chinese culture. The river is the
main image throughout the story, not only creating a geographical backdrop for the story within
the story, but to create a platform for illustrating the concepts of cultural displacement and the
major pitfall of emigration: a slow fading of heritage over time.
The folklore that the grandmother tells, compared to the active setting of the story, clearly
illustrates the differences between the Chinese and American cultures. The grandmother is
critical of the girls’ fighting – “Xiushila! Shame on you. Fighting like a bunch of chickens,”
(Chang 2) – and also uses a Chinese moniker, rather than the American names that the narrator
uses to refer to the other granddaughters. These instances illustrate the differences between the
grandmother’s Chinese mentality and the American mentality of her granddaughters. The
grandmother also mentions the sounds of the prairie crickets, and how, somehow, the sound
inspires the sound of the Yangtze river, despite the two sounds being nothing alike; it is more of
a longing memory rather than any similarity between the two geographies, finding familiar
memories in the unfamiliar. She also speaks of life on the river, the way that the river not only
represents life but provides it. She takes the girls through an explanation of the daily life on the
river, explaining the processes of river life; the characters in her story are fishermen, making
their living in the hands-on agricultural sector. This is a sector that has largely been dissolved in
modern America, marking another important difference in the societies and cultures. The
narrator thinks on this, pondering that “We had only known blue swimming pools, but we tried
to imagine the sudden shock of cold and the plunge, deep into the water” (Chang 2). Once again,
the differences between the cultures are amazingly clear; they have never seen something like the
majesty of the Yangtze valley. America does not afford them those kinds of geographical
wonders.
Additionally, the differences in prose between the descriptions of the girls and the
descriptions in the grandmother’s story are striking. The way that the grandmother speaks is
much more poetic, far more descriptive and detailed, than the rest of the story. The imagery is
brighter, clearer, and almost romantic; the rest of the story is very bare bones in comparison.
This serves to show her appreciation for her heritage and possibly suggests that she much prefers
the Chinese lifestyle to the American one. The girls, at the end, have become lost in their own
thoughts and miss the stars emerging, implying that they might not be as in touch with nature as
their culture would normally suggest. And, in direct contrast to the beautiful tale of the river and
its wonders, the girls are sitting on the porch, “the ground beneath [them] as dry and hard as a
bone” (Chang 4). This is fairly direct in suggesting that America is ‘dry,’ lacking in moisture
(their Chinese culture).
The story’s setting and other literary devices play an important role in portraying the
impact of immigration. Firstly, one of the reasons that the grandmother gives for telling her
stories is to help the girls “keep up [their] Chinese” (Chang 2). This is a very clear indication of
two things: the difference in language is one of the most obvious differences between the two
cultures, but it also implies that because of their geographic location, the granddaughters are
losing their grasp on their native language. Immigrants’ cultural heritage is lost and new
generations become used to the American or host culture. The retention of the primary cultural
heritage becomes harder with each passing generation. The story, merely within the mention of
the grandmother helping them keep up with their Chinese, illuminates the challenge that
immigrant families face to maintain their language and their roots. The longer they spend
integrated into American society and the English language, the more they will lose of their
heritage, including the language. This is an attempt on the grandmother’s part to help rekindle
their heritage at least in a small way, by forcing them to practice Chinese, just as the story itself
helps to remind them of their roots. The grandmother’s description of the geographical features
in China, set against the images of the porch and the highly American setting, creates a feeling of
mental displacement, almost as though the story is inaccessible to the listeners due to the location
in which it is being told. Chinese folklore, told in Chinese, on a porch in America to the sound of
prairie crickets is a very stark contrast, once again illustrating the marked differences between
the geographies.
One of the other prominent things that the grandmother’s story serves to do is to remind
both the granddaughters (and the readers) of the ancient tradition of oral storytelling. This is not
a common modern American practice (excluding Native Americans) because the developed
country is too young; China, going back so many centuries, used storytelling. This oral tradition
is the way the grandmother is able to connect with her kin, by drawing them in to the beauty of
the story and then leaving them with questions. In so doing, she forces them to think, for
themselves, about their lineage and heritage, which in turn brings them, closer to it. It pulls them
out of the American society into which they’ve been integrated, and shoves them back towards
their roots, at least in a mental sense, and keeping their heritage extant. The story connects the
girls to their heritage and opens their mind to think and explore more about their roots. As an
added bonus, it also stops them from fighting after she’s gone to bed; they are too busy
wondering to go back to “fighting like chickens.” The river, in her oral story, symbolizes the
depth and strength of their heritage. The Chinese people and, more specifically, the grandmother
and granddaughters’ lineage form a deep bond: “Unlike mountains, we cannot be powered down
or broken apart. Instead, we run together, like raindrops. Our strength and spirit wear down
mountains into sand. But even our people must respect the water” (Chang 2). The spectacular
image draws together the whole story, with the river running through it as a solidifying force,
and, of course, the river is ever flowing, with no disconnection, from the catchment to the sea.
This is a solid implication, from her to the girls, that they will never truly be disconnected from
their heritage, even if the “flow” of life takes them away from it in different ways.
It is clear, from all of the different imagery and the main image of the water, that
geographic location is a large aspect of heritage; the physical features of the land influence the
way of life, the collective subconscious of the people, and the culture as a whole. Heritage or
lineage also being called “roots” is no mistake of language; culture and heritage are as much a
part of the land as tree roots, and ripping them up and moving them from place will damage the
tree. As people move away from their ancestral lands, their culture and heritage will undoubtedly
fade and face changes, just as the girls do, from struggling with their Chinese to being fully
integrated into American society. There are things to be gained from leaving relocating;
assimilation, new cultural learning, new languages, new opportunities. But in leaving, they lose a
part of themselves, as well. That is the sadness of the story; though the grandmother tries to
rekindle their heritage and remind them of where they come from, the girls will be forever
altered from assimilating into a culture that does not line up with theirs.
Works Cited
Lan Samantha Chang. “Water Names”. New Sudden Fiction: Short-short Stories from America
and Beyond. W.W. Norton, 2007.
Name
Professor
Fiction
Date
Emigration and Fading Heritage in “Water Names”
Lan Samantha Chang’s short story “Water Names” constructs an artful comparison
between the ancient Chinese culture and modern American culture. In a way, the story imitates
the immigration experience, setting the old Chinese tale into a modern American framework; the
grandmother, who remembers Chinese culture, is set against the granddaughters, who behave
much more like the American girls they are intended to portray. The grandmother and her
granddaughters are in the midst of the American lifestyle, while the oral tradition of storytelling
and the characters in the story that’s told are meant to represent Chinese culture. The river is the
main image throughout the story, not only creating a geographical backdrop for the story within
the story, but to create a platform for illustrating the concepts of cultural displacement and the
major pitfall of emigration: a slow fading of heritage over time.
The folklore that the grandmother tells, compared to the active setting of the story, clearly
illustrates the differences between the Chinese and American cultures. The grandmother is
critical of the girls’ fighting – “Xiushila! Shame on you. Fighting like a bunch of chickens,”
(Chang 2) – and also uses a Chinese moniker, rather than the American names that the narrator
uses to refer to the other granddaughters. These instances illustrate the differences between the
grandmother’s Chinese mentality and the American mentality of her granddaughters. The
grandmother also mentions the sounds of the prairie crickets, and how, somehow, the sound
inspires the sound of the Yangtze river, despite the two sounds being nothing alike; it is more of
a longing memory rather than any similarity between the two geographies, finding familiar
memories in the unfamiliar. She also speaks of life on the river, the way that the river not only
represents life but provides it. She takes the girls through an explanation of the daily life on the
river, explaining the processes of river life; the characters in her story are fishermen, making
their living in the hands-on agricultural sector. This is a sector that has largely been dissolved in
modern America, marking another important difference in the societies and cultures. The
narrator thinks on this, pondering that “We had only known blue swimming pools, but we tried
to imagine the sudden shock of cold and the plunge, deep into the water” (Chang 2). Once again,
the differences between the cultures are amazingly clear; they have never seen something like the
majesty of the Yangtze valley. America does not afford them those kinds of geographical
wonders.
Additionally, the differences in prose between the descriptions of the girls and the
descriptions in the grandmother’s story are striking. The way that the grandmother speaks is
much more poetic, far more descriptive and detailed, than the rest of the story. The imagery is
brighter, clearer, and almost romantic; the rest of the story is very bare bones in comparison.
This serves to show her appreciation for her heritage and possibly suggests that she much prefers
the Chinese lifestyle to the American one. The girls, at the end, have become lost in their own
thoughts and miss the stars emerging, implying that they might not be as in touch with nature as
their culture would normally suggest. And, in direct contrast to the beautiful tale of the river and
its wonders, the girls are sitting on the porch, “the ground beneath [them] as dry and hard as a
bone” (Chang 4). This is fairly direct in suggesting that America is ‘dry,’ lacking in moisture
(their Chinese culture).
The story’s setting and other literary devices play an important role in portraying the
impact of immigration. Firstly, one of the reasons that the grandmother gives for telling her
stories is to help the girls “keep up [their] Chinese” (Chang 2). This is a very clear indication of
two things: the difference in language is one of the most obvious differences between the two
cultures, but it also implies that because of their geographic location, the granddaughters are
losing their grasp on their native language. Immigrants’ cultural heritage is lost and new
generations become used to the American or host culture. The retention of the primary cultural
heritage becomes harder with each passing generation. The story, merely within the mention of
the grandmother helping them keep up with their Chinese, illuminates the challenge that
immigrant families face to maintain their language and their roots. The longer they spend
integrated into American society and the English language, the more they will lose of their
heritage, including the language. This is an attempt on the grandmother’s part to help rekindle
their heritage at least in a small way, by forcing them to practice Chinese, just as the story itself
helps to remind them of their roots. The grandmother’s description of the geographical features
in China, set against the images of the porch and the highly American setting, creates a feeling of
mental displacement, almost as though the story is inaccessible to the listeners due to the location
in which it is being told. Chinese folklore, told in Chinese, on a porch in America to the sound of
prairie crickets is a very stark contrast, once again illustrating the marked differences between
the geographies.
One of the other prominent things that the grandmother’s story serves to do is to remind
both the granddaughters (and the readers) of the ancient tradition of oral storytelling. This is not
a common modern American practice (excluding Native Americans) because the developed
country is too young; China, going back so many centuries, used storytelling. This oral tradition
is the way the grandmother is able to connect with her kin, by drawing them in to the beauty of
the story and then leaving them with questions. In so doing, she forces them to think, for
themselves, about their lineage and heritage, which in turn brings them, closer to it. It pulls them
out of the American society into which they’ve been integrated, and shoves them back towards
their roots, at least in a mental sense, and keeping their heritage extant. The story connects the
girls to their heritage and opens their mind to think and explore more about their roots. As an
added bonus, it also stops them from fighting after she’s gone to bed; they are too busy
wondering to go back to “fighting like chickens.” The river, in her oral story, symbolizes the
depth and strength of their heritage. The Chinese people and, more specifically, the grandmother
and granddaughters’ lineage form a deep bond: “Unlike mountains, we cannot be powered down
or broken apart. Instead, we run together, like raindrops. Our strength and spirit wear down
mountains into sand. But even our people must respect the water” (Chang 2). The spectacular
image draws together the whole story, with the river running through it as a solidifying force,
and, of course, the river is ever flowing, with no disconnection, from the catchment to the sea.
This is a solid implication, from her to the girls, that they will never truly be disconnected from
their heritage, even if the “flow” of life takes them away from it in different ways.
It is clear, from all of the different imagery and the main image of the water, that
geographic location is a large aspect of heritage; the physical features of the land influence the
way of life, the collective subconscious of the people, and the culture as a whole. Heritage or
lineage also being called “roots” is no mistake of language; culture and heritage are as much a
part of the land as tree roots, and ripping them up and moving them from place will damage the
tree. As people move away from their ancestral lands, their culture and heritage will undoubtedly
fade and face changes, just as the girls do, from struggling with their Chinese to being fully
integrated into American society. There are things to be gained from leaving relocating;
assimilation, new cultural learning, new languages, new opportunities. But in leaving, they lose a
part of themselves, as well. That is the sadness of the story; though the grandmother tries to
rekindle their heritage and remind them of where they come from, the girls will be forever
altered from assimilating into a culture that does not line up with theirs.
Works Cited
Lan Samantha Chang. “Water Names”. New Sudden Fiction: Short-short Stories from America
and Beyond. W.W. Norton, 2007.
Overview of “The Elements of Fiction”
FICTION
• This document/handout is an addendum to Appendix Two: “The Elements of Fiction” in your anthology
(1676-91). It will provide emphasis and additional comments regarding the elements of fiction (also
called literary or craft elements). This handout can also be used continuously as a resource for the rest of
our semester’s class discussions.
• As David Foster Wallace says, good fiction “comforts the disturbed and disturbs the comfortable”
(1726). In order for the story as a whole to be this effective and memorable, its parts need to work well
together. We are looking at the function of those parts, or literary elements, in this unit.
• The primary elements we will focus on are the following:
– Plot
– Character
– Setting
– Point-of-View
– Style
– Theme
PLOT
• Definition: “the series of events in a NARRATIVE that form the ACTION, in which a CHARACTER or
characters face an internal or external CONFLICT that propels the STORY to a CLIMAX and an
ultimate RESOLUTION. Plot determines the way the reader experiences the story. It is an aesthetic
pattern created in the different stages of the narrative, encompassing the EXPOSTITION, RISING
ACTION, CLIMAX, FALLING ACTION, and CONCLUSION” (1742).
• Notice the necessity of CAUSATION in a traditional plot. It is not just multiple events happening
independently of each other; these events cause, or are the result of, other events.
• While plot may be responsible for the way we experience a story, it is only one part of the equation.
Many elements together create our experience.

Another name for the stages of a narrative is FREYTAG’S PYRAMID. You are probably familiar with
its shape:
Image Source: http://www.freebernmusic.com/film-dramatic-arc
Typically, the terms used in this “pyramid” are uniform. However, at times resolution is replaced with
denouement (or a final ‘untying of knots’/resolving of conflict in the story; this term is often
mistranslated ironically as ‘the tying up of loose ends’).
(PLOT cont.)
• A simpler way to define plot is by Aristotle’s theory: Plot consists of a beginning, a middle, and an end.
These sections, of course, are related by causation, and the lines between them are often blurred.
• When we ask “What happens?” in a story, we are asking about plot. However, as E.M. Forster observes,
plot also answers “why” the events happen—again, an emphasis on causation (1677).
• Eudora Welty discusses plot as “the tracing out of a meaning” (1680). In addition to the reason for each
event that occurs, there is an ultimate and grander reason for the way the plot unfolds. This kind of
meaning is what we refer to when we talk about …
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code ESSAYSHELP