Planning requires well-written learning objectives. A learning objective must be specific to the content being presented, measurable, and attainable by student

  

  Assessment Description
Instruction planning requires well-written learning objectives. A learning objective must be specific to the content being presented, measurable, and attainable by students within the restrictions of the class. Clear learning objectives keep the instruction focused and help the students understand the learning expectations. Learning objectives must also be aligned to academic standards. Accurate alignment will guide instructional planning and enhance student academic success.
Aligning learning objectives to state standards is an important part in developing a unit of study. Units of study can last for several days, weeks, or longer.
Use the “STEM Unit Plan” template to create a 5-day STEM unit plan. Your unit plan will focus on your content area, including cross-disciplinary content from all STEM subjects.
Select a concept within your content area on which to focus and create an appropriate and descriptive title for your unit. Complete the first five rows of the “STEM Unit Plan” template.
P.S: Science is my content area.

SEC-582-T2-STEMUnitPlanTemplate1.docx

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Planning requires well-written learning objectives. A learning objective must be specific to the content being presented, measurable, and attainable by student
Just from $10/Page
Order Essay

6thGradeScienceQuarter3CurriculumMap2021-2022.pdf

GCU College of Education
LESSON UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE

STEM Unit Plan
Title of Unit and Brief Summary: Create a title for each lesson and 1-2 sentences summarizing the lesson, identifying the central focus based on the content and skills you are teaching.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Title of Lesson and Brief Rationale
Create a title for each lesson and 1-2 sentences describing the rationale of the lesson and how it will integrate multiple STEM content areas

State-Specific Standards
List specific grade-level state standards that teach and assess multiple science content areas.

Next Generation Science Standard
Identify which Next Generation Science Standards align with state standards.

Learning Objectives
Based on state standards and NGSS, what will be the purpose and focus of the activity? Describe the learning content to be covered.

Unit Resources (including technology) that would be included in the unit.

APA Citations
(include APA citation for each above Unit Resource)

Resources Rationale
Describe the purpose of the resource and its value in the lesson.

Knowledge and Skills
Specific knowledge and skills students demonstrate based on the day’s activities.

Academic Language and Vocabulary
Content-specific vocabulary included in the lesson.

Summary of Activities for the Lesson
Observable student learning activities and how they are aligned to state standards.

Formative Assessments
Assessments used to monitor student progress and modify instruction.

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved

,

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
1 of 46
Shelby County Schools Science Vision Shelby County Schools’ vision of science education is to ensure that from early childhood to the end of the 12th grade, all students have heightened curiosity and an increased wonder of science; possess sufficient knowledge of science and engineering to engage in discussions; are able to learn and apply scientific and technological information in their everyday lives; and have the skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, and communication to enter careers of their choice, while having access to connections to science, engineering, and technology.
To achieve this, Shelby County Schools has employed The Tennessee Academic Standards for Science to craft meaningful curricula that is innovative and provide a myriad of learning opportunities that extend beyond mastery of basic scientific principles.
Introduction In 2014, the Shelby County Schools Board of Education adopted a set of ambitious, yet attainable goals for school and student performance. The District is committed to these goals, as further described in our strategic plan, Destination 2025. In order to achieve these ambitious goals, we must collectively work to provide our students with high quality standards aligned instruction. The Tennessee Academic Standards for Science provide a common set of expectations for what students will know and be able to do at the end of each grade, can be located in the Tennessee Science Standards Reference. Tennessee Academic Standards for Science are rooted in the knowledge and skills that students need to succeed in post-secondary study or careers. While the academic standards establish desired learning outcomes, the curricula provide instructional planning designed to help students reach these outcomes. The curriculum maps contain components to ensure that instruction focuses students toward college and career readiness. Educators will use this guide and the standards as a roadmap for curriculum and instruction. The sequence of learning is strategically positioned so that necessary foundational skills are spiraled in order to facilitate student mastery of the standards.
Our collective goal is to ensure our students graduate ready for college and career. Being College and Career Ready entails, many aspects of teaching and learning. We want our students to apply their scientific learning in the classroom and beyond. These valuable experiences include students being facilitators of their own learning through problem solving and thinking critically. The Science and Engineering Practices are valuable tools used by students to engage in understanding how scientific knowledge develops. These practices rest on important “processes and proficiencies” with longstanding importance in science education. The science maps contain components to ensure that instruction focuses students toward understanding how science and engineering can contribute to meeting many of the major challenges that confront society today. The maps are centered around five basic components: the Tennessee Academic Standards for Science, Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Phenomena.
The Tennessee Academic Standards for Science were developed using the National Research Council’s 2012 publication, A Framework for K-12 Science Education as their foundation. The framework presents a new model for science instruction that is a stark contrast to what has come to be the norm in science classrooms. Thinking about science had become memorizing concepts and solving mathematical formulae. Practicing science had become prescribed lab situations with predetermined outcomes. The framework proposes a three-dimensional approach to science education that capitalizes on a child’s natural curiosity. The Science Framework for K-12 Science Education provides the blueprint for developing the effective science practices. The Framework expresses a vision in science education that requires students to operate at the nexus of three dimensions of learning: Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas. The Framework identified a small number of disciplinary core ideas that all students should learn with increasing depth and sophistication, from kindergarten through grade twelve. Key to the vision expressed in the Framework is for

https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/education/standards/sci/sci_standards_reference.pdf
https://www.nap.edu/catalog/13165/a-framework-for-k-12-science-education-practices-crosscutting-concepts

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
2 of 46
students to learn these disciplinary core ideas in the context of science and engineering practices. The importance of combining Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts and Disciplinary Core Ideas is stated in the Framework as follows:
Standards and performance expectations that are aligned to the framework must take into account that students cannot fully understand scientific and engineering ideas without engaging in the practices of inquiry and the discourses by which such ideas are developed and refined. At the same time, they cannot learn or show competence in practices except in the context of specific content. (NRC Framework, 2012, p. 218)
To develop the skills and dispositions to use scientific and engineering practices needed to further their learning and to solve problems, students need to experience instruction in which they use multiple practices in developing a particular core idea and apply each practice in the context of multiple core ideas. We use the term “practices” instead of a term such as “skills” to emphasize that engaging in scientific investigation requires not only skill but also knowledge that is specific to each practice. Students in grades K-12 should engage in all eight practices over each grade band. Crosscutting concepts have application across all domains of science. As such, they are a way of linking the different domains of science. Crosscutting concepts have value because they provide students with connections and intellectual tools that are related across the differing areas of disciplinary content and can enrich their application of practices and their understanding of core ideas. There are seven crosscutting concepts that bridge disciplinary boundaries, uniting core ideas throughout the fields of science and engineering. Their purpose is to help students deepen their understanding of the disciplinary core ideas and develop a coherent and scientifically based view of the world.
The map is meant to support effective planning and instruction to rigorous standards. It is not meant to replace teacher planning, prescribe pacing or instructional practice. In fact, our goal is not to merely “cover the curriculum,” but rather to “uncover” it by developing students’ deep understanding of the content and mastery of the standards. Teachers who are knowledgeable about and intentionally align the learning target (standards and objectives), topic, text(s), task, and needs (and assessment) of the learners are best positioned to make decisions about how to support student learning toward such mastery. Teachers are therefore expected–with the support of their colleagues, coaches, leaders, and other support providers–to exercise their professional judgment aligned to our shared vision of effective instruction, the Teacher Effectiveness Measure (TEM) and related best practices. However, while the framework allows for flexibility and encourages each teacher/teacher team to make it their own, our expectations for student learning are non-negotiable. We must ensure all our children have access to rigor—high-quality teaching and learning to grade level specific standards, including purposeful support of literacy and language learning across the content areas.

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
3 of 46

Learning Progression At the end of the elementary science experience, students can observe and measure phenomena using appropriate tools. They are able to organize objects and ideas into broad concepts first by single properties and later by multiple properties. They can create and interpret graphs and models that explain phenomena. Students can keep notebooks to record sequential observations and identify simple patterns. They are able to design and conduct investigations, analyze results, and communicate the results to others. Students will carry their curiosity, interest and enjoyment of the scientific world view, scientific inquiry, and the scientific enterprise into middle school.
At the end of the middle school science experience, students can discover relationships by making observations and by the systematic gathering of data. They can identify relevant evidence and valid arguments. Their focus has shifted from the general to the specific and from the simple to the complex. They use scientific information to make wise decision related to conservation of the natural world. They recognize that there are both negative and positive implications to new technologies.
As an SCS graduate, former students should be literate in science, understand key science ideas, aware that science and technology are interdependent human enterprises with strengths and limitations, familiar with the natural world and recognizes both its diversity and unity, and able to apply scientific knowledge and ways of thinking for individual and social purposes.

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
4 of 46
Structure of the Standards • Grade Level/Course Overview: An overview that describes that specific content and themes for each grade level or high school course. • Disciplinary Core Idea: Scientific and foundational ideas that permeate all grades and connect common themes that bridge scientific disciplines. • Standard: Statements of what students can do to demonstrate knowledge of the conceptual understanding. Each performance indicator includes a specific science and
engineering practice paired with the content knowledge and skills that students should demonstrate to meet the grade level or high school course standards.

Purpose of Science Curriculum Maps This map is a guide to help teachers and their support providers (e.g., coaches, leaders) on their path to effective, college and career ready (CCR) aligned instruction and our pursuit of Destination 2025. It is a resource for organizing instruction around the Tennessee Academic Standards for Science, which define what to teach and what students need to learn at each grade level. The map is designed to reinforce the grade/course-specific standards and content (scope) and provides suggested sequencing, pacing, time frames, and aligned resources. Our hope is that by curating and organizing a variety of standards-aligned resources, teachers will be able to spend less time wondering what to teach and searching for quality materials (though they may both select from and/or supplement those included here) and have more time to plan, teach, assess, and reflect with colleagues to continuously improve practice and best meet the needs of their students.
The map is meant to support effective planning and instruction to rigorous standards. It is not meant to replace teacher planning, prescribe pacing or instructional practice. In fact, our goal is not to merely “cover the curriculum,” but rather to “uncover” it by developing students’ deep understanding of the content and mastery of the standards. Teachers who are knowledgeable about and intentionally align the learning target (standards and objectives), topic, text(s), task, and needs (and assessment) of the learners are best positioned to make decisions about how to support student learning toward such mastery. Teachers are therefore expected–with the support of their colleagues, coaches, leaders, and other support providers–to exercise their professional judgment aligned to our shared vision of effective instruction, the Teacher Effectiveness Measure (TEM) and related best practices. However, while the framework allows for flexibility and encourages each teacher/teacher team to make it their own, our expectations for student learning are non-negotiable. We must ensure all our children have access to rigor—high-quality teaching and learning to grade level specific standards, including purposeful support of literacy and language learning across the content areas.

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
5 of 46
Suggested Station Rotation Activities Teacher Led Whole Group (start of class)
Prior to releasing the students into their initial station, the teacher will address them whole group. This time will be used to introduce the lesson, discuss the TN Academic Standard(s) for Science. Annotate the performance-based objective(s) and familiarize the students with the academic vocabulary.
6-8

Teacher Led Station

Online Station (Tech-Infused)
Offline Station (Small Group Collaboration)
The teacher could utilize this time for such tasks as listed below:
During students’ time at this station, the teacher could engage their students in any of the tasks found below:
During students’ time at this station, the teacher could engage their students in any of the tasks found below:
Tasks
• Modeling a task/skill needed in the lesson. • Having a class discussion about that evening’s
HW assignment, or morning’s BW assignment. Ensuring that students understand the concepts covered in the lesson.
• Conducting a teacher demo (brief quick labs) • Face to face chat with students to answer
questions and address misconceptions. • Teacher facilitated discussion. Teacher can
prompt students with open-ended questions to gauge mastery and conceptual understanding of students.
• Flipgrid (teacher could leave a video recording of instructions, specific details surrounding the tasks provided at this station)
• Self-paced Nearpod lesson • Conduct research • Create presentations (PowerPoint, Sway) • Collaborative tasks on Padlet • Kahoot (quizzes, CFU) • Quizlet • FLVS (Florida Virtual School in the Canvas
Platform). • Students can engage in a learning opportunity
in EdPuzzle https://bit.ly/3djEFOU • Students can engage in an online simulations
or interactives such as, o PhET Simulations o Virtual Labs

• Flipgrid (teacher could leave a video recording of instructions, specific details surrounding the tasks provided at this station)
• Read, annotate a scientific text • Conduct research • Performance Tasks • Group discussions (Teacher can have a
prompt posted at the station to guide student discussions.)
• Writing tasks (Read a scientific text and write a summary, reflection, construct an explanation, indicate cause and effect, argue from evidence).
• Student presentations • Independent tasks (Read a scientific text,
write a reflection) • Inquiry Labs • Collaborative tasks (projects) • Interactive Notebooks (composition
Notebooks)

https://bit.ly/3djEFOU

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
6 of 46

Resources
Area in the class that the teacher can interface with a small group of students.
• Laptops, desktops, computer lab • Microsoft Forms • Microsoft Teams (Class Notebook) • Padlet https://bit.ly/2RC7zBA • Nearpod https://bit.ly/3uSjk55 • Flipgrid https://bit.ly/32hOJ4F • Kahoot https://bit.ly/2OVAaRo • Florida Virtual Schools (in Canvas) • HMH ThinkCentral https://clever.com/in/scs
Printed articles, scientific journals, textbooks. *These resources are online so the teacher can provide printed copies of text from the following sources: Newsela https://bit.ly/3acZ06O DOGO news https://bit.ly/3skpXLX Scholastic Classroom Magazine https://bit.ly/2RDMeHW Science News for Students https://bit.ly/3uTNwNf
Supplementary resources to support each station can be found by clicking on the Additional Resources section of each lesson within this curriculum map. Teacher Led Whole Group (Class Wrap-Up)
The teacher will wrap up the lesson and provide details/instruction on homework if assigned. Answer any lingering questions that students may have. Give students an exit ticket.
o Modeling a task/skill needed for the next days’ lesson. o Discussing that evening’s HW assignment. Ensuring that students understand the task. o Modeling a task/skill needed for the homework to be assigned that evening.

https://bit.ly/2RC7zBA
https://bit.ly/3uSjk55
https://bit.ly/32hOJ4F
https://bit.ly/2OVAaRo
https://clever.com/in/scs
https://bit.ly/3acZ06O
https://bit.ly/3skpXLX
https://bit.ly/2RDMeHW
https://bit.ly/3uTNwNf

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
7 of 46
6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1 Energy
Unit 2 Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3 Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4 Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5 Earth’s Water
Unit 6 Human
Impact on the Environment
Unit 7 Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8 Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks UNIT 4: Earth’s Resources (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s) How do the Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 4, Lesson 1 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30 Nonrenewable Resources 1 week How do we use nonrenewable energy resources? energy resource, nuclear energy, fossil fuel, fission
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources DCI(s) 6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be addressed again in future lessons.* 6.ESS3.1 Differentiate between renewable and nonrenewable resources by asking questions about their availability and sustainability. Explanation(s)and Support of Standard(s) from TN Science Reference Guide 6.ESS3.1 Renewable resources are resources that can be regenerated within a human lifetime. While this then infers that non-renewable resources must develop over longer periods of time. Beyond mere memorization of those parameters, students should recognize that the processes that create mineral, groundwater, and energy (fuels) happen at geologic rates as a result of geologic
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be referenced again in future lessons.* 6.ESS3.1 SWBAT ask questions about renewable and nonrenewable resources IOT identify where humans get their resources and patterns in distribution. SWBAT define problems related to using resources that are limited IOT explain how resources are not stable and can change over time. SWBAT construct explanations and design solutions about renewable and nonrenewable resources IOT differentiate between them based on availability and sustainability. SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the distribution of resources around earth IOT
Curricular Materials HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 4, Lesson 3 pp. 268- 281 Engage • Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 243 • Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 243 • Looking Ahead Probing Questions, TE p. 270 Explore Energy Resources • Modeling Nonrenewable Resources Quick Lab, TE
p. 271 • How Can We Measure the Impact of
Nonrenewable Energy? Virtual Lab, TE p. 271 Explain Energy Resources • Do the Math #5, SE p. 244 • Compare #6, SE p. 244 Fossil Fuels • Think Outside the Book #8, SE p. 246

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
8 of 46
processes. Because geologic processes do not occur uniformly, there is not a uniform distribution of resources. (e.g., oil deposits in the middle east, coal deposits in the western United States, gold deposits in California, the use of Tennessee waterways for hydroelectric power generation.) As humans use nonrenewable resources, they are restored, but in amounts of time that greatly exceed those of near generations. Thus, these resources are considered limited. It is not intended that students memorize the processes for the formation of all non-renewables, but rather to understand that they are in some way connected to geologic processes. A limited number of examples can be used to establish this idea. Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s) Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions 6.ESS3.1 Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s) Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.1
explain the cause and effect relationship of geologic rate and geologic processes. Learning Outcomes • Differentiate between renewable and nonrenewable
resources. • Describe the characteristics of fossil fuels and
advantages and disadvantages of using them. • Explain how nuclear energy is created and used to
generate electricity. • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using
nuclear energy.
• Active Reading #9, SE p. 247 • Active Reading #11, SE p. 248 Nuclear Energy • Compare #12, SE p. 249 • Active Reading #13, SE p. 250 • Visualize It! #14, SE p. 250 • Evaluate #15, SE p. 251 • Is It Safe? Discussion, TE p. 270 Extend Reinforce and Review • Process Chart Graphic Organizer, TE p. 274 • Visual Summary, SE p. 252 Going Further • Health Connection, TE p. 274 • Physical Science Connection, TE p. 274 Evaluate Formative Assessment • Reteach, TE p. 275 • Throughout TE • Lesson Review, SE p. 253 Summative Assessment • Nonrenewable Energy Resources Alternative
Assessment, TE p. 275 • Lesson Quiz
The following resources can be accessed by clicking on the hyperlinks below:
Additional Resources ESL Supports and Scaffolds

https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
9 of 46

Suggested Phenomenon
The Earth has many natural resources that can be renewed in our lifetime, however, many cannot. Discuss this idea with students, giving them time to generate and record ideas.
Click on the picture to find out how a dairy farm is using a methane digester to turn cow poop into electricity. Students can complete a See Think Wonder Template after watching the video.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

Shelby County Schools 2021-2022
10 of 46
6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1 Energy
Unit 2 Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3 Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4 Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5 Earth’s Water
Unit 6 Human
Impact on the Environment
Unit 7 Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8 Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks UNIT 4: Earth’s Resources (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s) How do the Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 4, Lesson 2 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30 Renewable Energy
Resources 1 week How do humans use renewable energy resources?
energy resources, hydroelectric energy, wind energy, biomass, solar energy, geothermal energy
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources DCI(s) 6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more
colle writers

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code ESSAYSHELP